Morning Walking Dress, January 1813

…the face. Note that the purse is called a ridicule in the description. This is the term used in all the ladies magazines of the period, as far as I…

Walking Dress, January 1811

…could also be made of black velvet and could have had blue fox fur trim. Wouldn’t that have been gorgeous! The purse is described as a “ridicule.” The twisting of…

Promenade Dress, August 1811

La Belle Assemblée, August 1811. “Promenade Dress” Note that the purse is called a ridicule. The term, which is seen often in French prints, possibly came about because it seemed…

Carriage Dress, December 1816

…more substantial, with a more rigid shape and a fixed handle. Indeed, they began to look very much like a modern purse. The soft fabric drawstring reticule continued in use…

Walking and Full Dresses, April 1806

…mouth of one of the ladies!) But close examination here shows this Egyptian-looking eye shadow is original to the print. Very odd. Note also that the purse she is holding…

Walking Dress, November 1811

purse referred to as a ridicule. The more well-known bastardized version of the word, reticule, did not come into general use until around 1830. The print is described in the…

Walking Dress, January 1810

…brim rising to a point above the forehead. Interestingly, the graduation or academic mortarboard is also called a trencher. Also note that the purse is called a ridicule. The term…

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